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Submitted: 02 Jul 2020
Accepted: 04 Nov 2020
ePublished: 21 Nov 2020
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J Renal Inj Prev. 2022;11(1): e9-e9.
doi: 10.34172/jrip.2022.09
  Abstract View: 387
  PDF Download: 242

Original

Zinc deficiency may play a crucial role in dialysis-associated bacterial infections

Zahra Lotfi 1 ORCID logo, Abbas Ali Zeraati 1 ORCID logo, Elaheh Dashti 2, Tina Zeraati 1 * ORCID logo, Maryam Arghiany 1, Farnaz Kalani-Moghaddam 3, Ashkan Haghighi 4

1 Kidney Transplantation Complications Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
2 Department of Internal Disease, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
3 Department of Pediatrician, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
4 Student Research Committee, Faculty of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran
*Corresponding author: Tina Zeraati, Email: zeraatit921@mums.ac.ir, tina_ze74@yahoo.com

Abstract

Introduction: Systemic bacterial infections are a common cause of mortality and morbidity in hemodialysis patients. Zinc has a critical role in several immune system functions. Patients who have enough amounts of zinc are able to better face infections caused by various pathogens in comparison to those with zinc insufficiency

Objective We sought to assess the role of zinc deficiency in dialysis-associated bacterial infections.

Patients and Methods: Eighty-Three adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis including 43 patients with bacterial infectious complications and 40 non-infected patients as well as 41 healthy individuals were enrolled. Clinical data, laboratory values including serum zinc level and imaging findings were collected. SPSS was utilized to analyze the data with a significance cutoff set at P < 0.05.

Results: Out of 124 participants, 80 (64.51%) were males and 44 (35.49%) were females. The mean age of infected hemodialysis group, non-infected hemodialysis group, and healthy controls were 50.8 ± 16.25, 49.1 ± 18.1, and 56.3 ± 18.2 years, respectively. Catheter site infection (37.3%) and urinary tract infection (30.2%) were the most common infections. The mean serum zinc concentration was significantly lower in the infected patients, compared to non-infected patients and healthy individuals (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: The ESRD patients on hemodialysis have lower serum zinc levels which are associated with increased risk of bacterial infection. The role of screening for zinc deficiency and use of supplemental zinc in these patients need to be studied.

Keywords: Chronic kidney disease, End-stage renal disease, Hemodialysis, Infection, Zinc

Implication for health policy/practice/research/medical education:

In a study on 83 adult patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) on hemodialysis including 43 patients with bacterial infectious complications and 40 non-infected patients as well as 41 healthy individuals, we found mean serum zinc concentration was significantly lower in the infected patients, compared to non-infected patients and healthy individuals (P<0.001). The ESRD patients on hemodialysis have lower serum zinc levels which is associated with increased risk of bacterial infection. The role of screening for zinc deficiency and the administration of supplemental zinc in these patients need to be studied.

Please cite this paper as: Lotfi Z, Zeraati AA, Dashti E, Zeraati T, Arghiany M, Kalani-Moghaddam F, Haghighi A. Zinc deficiency may play a crucial role in dialysis-associated bacterial infections. J Renal Inj Prev. 2022; 11(1): e09. doi: 10.34172/ jrip.2022.09.

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